These Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra musicians bring a terrific style and panache to this irresistible new disc. They receive an excellent, well balanced SACD recording from the Concertgebouw, Amsterdam and there are useful booklet notes.

The Classical Reviewer (Bruce Reader), March 2016

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Janácek's Mládi (Youth) is droll and quicksilver, exuding a capriciousness that these players revel in. Scored for wind quintet plus bass clarinet, the flautist doubling on piccolo, Janácek's colour chart and very active interweaving of ideas is vividly brought out ... Superb performances, superbly recorded.

Classical Ear (Colin Anderson), April 2016

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I’d trust the violinist who wedded works by Roy Harris and John Adams on one of the most absorbing concerto discs for many years, to bring us interesting repertoire, and that is exactly what Tamsin Waley-Cohen does here. [Richard Blackford’s writing in Niobe] is thematically concentrated, notably evocative and clearly heartfelt. It is close to Szymanowski in sound and in its solutions in pitting a solo violin against a lustrous orchestra. A particularly lustrous orchestra in this case, the Czech Philharmonic, against which Waley-Cohen’s violin tone is characteristically strong and steely, notably in the double-stop cadenza over a drone in ‘The Mourner’.

Gramophone Magazine (Andrew Mellor), September 2018

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Her control of phrasing, and especially the ends of phrases provided evidence of a thoughtful musician who has all the technical accomplishment and confidence she needs to project her thoughts. Her intonation is sure and her tone fine, perfectly formed. In her highly musical performance of the Brahms’s D minor sonata her delicacy of sound and the rythm in the third movement was marvelous, as was the drive in the finale. She breathed each movement, and even the whole sonata, as one.

New York Times

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Elina Vähälä played Corigliano's concerto in Turku in brilliantly glorious manner, in ecstasy of striking mastery, that was regulated by bright, polished control.

Helsingin Sanomat

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The fluent, stylish performance by the gifted Finnish violinist Elina Vahala, in her Chicago debut, revealed a musician whose brilliant technique is matched by abundant spirit, sensitivity and imagination.

Chicago Tribune

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Tamsin Waley-Cohen’s Albion Quartet played Beethoven’s Op 74 string quartet, The Harp, with (...) bucketfuls of energy, teamwork and ideas.

The Times (Richard Morrison), 2018

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Current RSNO assistant conductor Holly Mathieson brings clarity and transparent appreciation for the elegance of the music to the seasonal diet of Strauss waltzes. Not to criticise the fine line-up of guest conductors we have seen already this season, but we do not see her often enough on the podium, where she was also a very informative emcee. This was a concert of charm and sophistication, miles from the barn-storming arena-filling approach that others have inflicted on these beautiful tunes.

The Herald Scotland (Keith Bruce), 2018 (RSNO, Viennese Gala, Stirling)

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... [If] there was an atmosphere conjured up it was mainly due to the efforts of the orchestra under the excellent New Zealand conductor Holly Mathieson. Her gestures were impeccably clear and yet expressive, and the orchestra responded impressively to her way with the score. She naturally feels just the right amount of give and take, enabling the music to flow. The orchestra needs to be extremely flexible to avoid exuding a sort of generalist Gallic feel, and Mathieson was particularly adept at isolating the central feel of a particular section, or following the unfolding drama naturally.

Seen and Heard International (Colin Clark), 2015 (Holland Park Opera)

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...[W]hat we had from the Junior Orchestra of the National Youth Orchestra of Scotland on Saturday was a phenomenal display of musicianship. I literally thought, on the night: "These musicians are between eight and 13 years old; what they are achieving here tonight, in a sold-out Greyfriars concert, where the buzz is electric, is genuinely outstanding." Everything they did, guided and released by the charismatic New Zealand conductor Holly Mathieson, from MacCunn's Land of the Mountain and Flood to Gliere's little-known, gloriously-melodic Horn Concerto, came soaring off the page.

The Herald Scotland (Michael Tumelty), 2015 (NYOS Junior Orchestra)

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[Josef Suk’s Meditation] begins quietly but builds to a powerful climax before fading into silence and the highly committed performance left a deep impression and a desire to hear the work again.

East Anglian Daily Times (Gareth Jones), 2018

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The heart gives a little leap at the prospect of Dvorak chamber music, especially when it comes from a duo as engaging and intelligent as Tamsin Waley-Cohen and Huw Watkins. […] It feels as though these performers have got the scale of this music just right: Nothing forced, no obvious straining for effect, just fresh, thoughtful and committed interpretations shot through with poetry and alertness. This is real chamber music.

Gramophone (Richard Bratby), January 2018

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"Lucerne's talented Music Director Clemens Heil conducts the score [of Verdi’s Falstaff] with real zing, and the Lucerne Symphony Orchestra coruscates with rhythmical precision and alluring timbre."

Opernwelt (Peter Hagmann), 2018

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“Violinist Alexander Sitkovetsky, like his accompanists, displayed an admirable technical facility and to this he added an incredibly clear sound blessed with a lovely silky sheen. Once more like the Tonkünstler, Sitkovetskyʼs power and projection were striking – I donʼt think Iʼve ever heard the harmonics in the first movement cadenza ring so loud, full and true.”

Seen & Heard (Claire Seymour), March 2017
Mendelssohn Violin Concerto Op.64 with the Vienna Tonkünstler Orchestra

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“Sitkovetsky harks back to an older tradition of violin playing not often heard these days.”

-The Washington Post (Patrick Rucker), December 2016
Recital at the Phillips Collection

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“..and thatʼs just exactly where a mischief breaks though, the same way that Liebreich had previously hinted at in the miniatures "Arbor Cosmica". The Russian-British soloist Alexander Sitkovetsky picks that up with a heightened and always keenly direct sound, especially in the third movement where the wild position changes of the solo part soar above the jocular hurricane of pizzicato of the orchestra –a final clear chord sounding the end of the storm. Liebreich beams, the orchestra smiles, and the audience is rapturous.”

Süddeutsche Zeitung (Rita Argauer), March 2016

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"The Albion Quartet displays the expected virtues of perfect (but natural-sounding) ensemble, a sense of intent communication between its four members and with the audience; they play with great vibrancy and a complementary sense of discipline and balance. They are evidently an ensemble eager to play works from right across the substantial repertoire for String Quartet, and also to design programmes which are far more than just a ‘random’ sequence of master works."

-Seen and Heard (Glyn Pursglove), 2017

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“Waley-Cohen captures the score’s spirit of infectious bonhomie to perfection, and brings a similar air of uncluttered simplicity and ingenuousness to the Four Romantic Pieces [by Dvorak], creating the bracing impression of inspired improvisation.”

–The Strad (Julian Haylock) (Review of Bohemia (CD), 2017

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Tamsin Waley-CohenWRB

“One of this year’s [Rising Stars] artists is the terrific British violinist Tamsin Waley-Cohen … In a programme that included a febrile and rhapsodic account of Poulenc’s Violin Sonata, Waley-Cohen gave the London premiere of Oliver Knussen’s Reflection ... this beautifully crafted eight-minute work is made of tiny aural brushstrokes suggesting water: ripples mirroring each other and bursting out in expression and ecstatic high lines.”

–The Observer (Fiona Maddocks), 2017

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Tamsin Waley-CohenWRB